I thought I was reading things – my past came flooding back to me. Back in the eighites there were a number of computing icons; Apple, IBM, Atari, Commodore and a name few will remember (unless they’re old hands like me) , the Apricot.

Apricot PC
Apricot PC

Apricot produced stylish computers that worked, most of the time. Take the Apricot PC, it featured a lovely little base unit that incorporated a folding lid over the floppy disk drives to keep those ugly slots and eject buttons from the public. The screen was small, unlike the huge monsters that sat atop of the IBM PC, the keyboard incroporated an LCD display and could be used as a desktop calculator and it was one of the first desktop computers to feature a trackerball, let alone a mouse. This resulted in a machine that looked great on the Managing Directors desk, and probably did nothing more than sit on the MD’s desk since few MDs in those days were interested in computers and thought of them more as a status symbol on their desk.

Apricot Picobook
Apricot Picobook

Anyway, I digress. Apricot was bought by Mitsubishi in the 1990s and the brand was slowly laid to rest – leaving the market for attractive and desirable computers to Apple. However, the brand was recently bought by one Shahid Sultan and it’s first new PC, the Apricot Picobook, has been released. No, it’s not stunningly good looking, in fact it looks like twenty other ultra portable Windows/Linux PCs. It doesn’t use any advanced technology, it shuns Intels latest range of Atom processors for an elderly Via C7 chip, but it does boast a long battery life of around 4 hours. Time will tell, but it does compete with well established models from the likes of Acer and Asus – is there room in the market for a product trading on a name that most of the modern industry doesn’t remember?

Useful links: Apricot Computers, Old Computers.com,  ACT/Apricot

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